1/20 Douglass Historical Marker Dedication - 2015

2/20 Thelma White - El Paso, Texas

3/20 Mildred Parish Massey - El Paso, Texas

4/20 Mildred Parish Massey - El Paso, Texas

5/20 Douglass Historical Marker Dedication

6/20 Douglass Historical Marker Dedication

7/20 Douglass Historical Marker Dedication

8/20 Douglass Historical Marker Dedication

9/20 Douglass Historical Marker Dedication - El Paso, Texas

10/20 Douglass Historical Marker Dedication

11/20 Douglass Historical Marker Dedication

12/20 Douglass Grammar and High School

13/20 Douglass Grammar and High School

14/20 Douglass Grammar and High School

15/20 Douglass Grammar and High School Historical Marker

16/20 Douglass Grammar and High School

17/20 Douglass Grammar and High School

18/20 Douglass Grammar and High School

19/20 Douglass Grammar and High School

20/20 Douglass Grammar and High School

description

Historians, dignitaries, EPISD officials and even former students gathered at the corner of Kansas Street and Fourth Avenue in El Paso, Texas to celebrate the unveiling of the new Texas Historical marker on the building that once housed Douglass Grammar and High School — El Paso’s school for African American students.

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Commemoration

  • Douglass High School
  • escuela secundaria Douglass

after Avenue add in El Paso, Texas

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Thelma Joyce White's family moved to El Paso when she was a little girl. Thelma graduated as class valedictorian from Douglass High School in 1954, the only school for African Americans in El Paso until the desegregation of schools in 1956. After, she applied for admission to Texas Western College (today: UTEP), she was rejected due to the university's policy of racial exclusion for black undergraduates. White then attended New Mexico A&M College in Las Cruces, New Mexico. Nonetheless, in March 1955 lawyers acting in her behalf filed suit in federal court, seeking White's admission to Texas Western. While the case was pending, the United States Supreme Court confirmed the desegregation in schools. White's attorneys, however, did not abandon the suit and on July 18 Federal District Judge Robert E. Thomason issued a declaratory judgment in her behalf, permanently enjoining the UT system from denying her or any other African-American student the right to study at Texas Western. In consequence, the first black students enrolled at Texas Western College. Thelma White however, did not enroll but continued to study at New Mexico A&M College until she married Maj. Curtis Camack. They had four children together, and three of them eventually attended the University of Texas at El Paso. White worked at the White Sands Missile Ranch for many years. An academic support network for African-American students at UTEP was founded in 1993 and named in her honor.

Central / University, (1950 - 1959), Meet El Pasoans

  • African Americans
  • Thelma White
  • women
  • UTEP
  • Texas Western College

tag women

tag UTEP, Texas Western College,

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Mildred Parish Massey was born in El Paso, Texas June 6, 1924. Her father, William Calhoun Parish was the first African American letter carrier in El Paso and spoke fluent Spanish. Her mother, Willie Pointer Parish was a homemaker who raised her daughters Juanita, Lois and Mildred. All 3 girls attended the excellent all black school, Douglass elementary and high school in El Paso.

Mildred played the saxophone in the band and marched in the Sun Bowl Parade. She was also the manager of the Douglass High School basketball team. She won a scholarship to Tillotson College in Austin Texas and transferred to Southern University in Baton Rouge, La to study business administration. When pledging to a sorority she learned that her friend could not pledge due to her darker skin color and immediately withdrew her application and asked Mary McLeod Bethune to come to campus to help change this discriminatory policy, which succeeded. Mildred moved to Portsmouth, Virginia and was hired to work as registrar and secretary to the president of Norfolk division of Virginia State College, now Norfolk State University.

Mildred returned to El Paso Texas and gave birth to 3 girls between 1946 and 1952 – Congresswoman Barbara Lee, Mrs. Mildred Whitfield and Mrs. Beverly Hardy. She broke many racial barriers as the first African American to be hired in key positions. She worked at the USO and was the first Black clerical worker at Ft. Bliss Texas in the Postal Locator. While working, she attended Texas Western College (now the University of Texas at El Paso) and was one of 7 students to integrate Texas Western. Mildred was an active member of the Easter Star Lodge, Phyllis Wheatley Club and the NAACP and Myrtle Ave Methodist Church.

In 1960 Mildred moved to San Fernando Calif where once again, she broke many racial barriers in the workplace as the first African American to work at the Raymond Lamp Company, Assistant Manager of Lerner Dress store in Panorama City, Calif and Manager of the Rembrandt Sign Co in San Fernando, Calif. and the Veterans Administration Hospital in Sylmar, Calif. At one point Mildred worked three jobs to take care of her aging father and 3 daughters.

In 1975 Mildred moved to Oakland California and worked for the Social Security Administration until her retirement in 1986. Upon her retirement, she helped found and manage her daughter, Barbara Lee’s business, Lee Associates, dba the WC Parish Co. until her second retirement in 1998 when she moved to Sun City, Arizona until 2010.

Mildred enjoys traveling and has visited Greece, Italy, Spain, Hawaii, The Bahamas, Mexico, Grenada, St. Maarten, Virgin Islands, Martha’s Vineyard, and loves to shop. She is intrigued with the beauty of butterflies and has a wonderful collection of butterfly ornaments and personal items, which bring her a lot of joy.

Mildred Massey currently lives at Grand lake Gardens in Oakland California and is Congresswoman Barbara Lee’s biggest supporter. She loves music and basketball and is a frequent attendee at the Oakland Symphony. Mildred Massey has adopted Allen Temple Baptist Church as her church home and appreciates the love and support of Pastor Emeritus J. Alfred Smith Sr., Pastor J. Alfred Smith Jr. and the entire Allen Temple Church family.

Mildred is proud of her 3 daughters, 7 grandchildren, 16 great grand children and 1 great, great grandchild.

(All information above was current until her death)

Congresswoman Barbara Lee’s mother Mildred Parish Massey, 90, passed away peacefully in Oakland, surrounded by family, on Monday, Feb. 16, 2015.


Central / Five Points, (1940 - 1949), Family and Friends

  • Mildred Parish - Massey
  • Mildred Parish
  • Barbara Lee
  • African American
  • women
  • Meet El Pasoans

tag women African American

tag women, African American,

What a beautiful woman

Mother of Barbara Lee --- Congresswoman from Oakland, California.

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THANK YOU FOR SHARING MY 90TH BIRTHDAY WITH ME. I LOVE YOU ALL. MILDRED (Mildred turn 90 in the year 2014)

Mildred Parish Massey was born in El Paso, Texas June 6, 1924. Her father, William Calhoun Parish was the first African American letter carrier in El Paso and spoke fluent Spanish. Her mother, Willie Pointer Parish was a homemaker who raised her daughters Juanita, Lois and Mildred. All 3 girls attended the excellent all black school, Douglass elementary and high school in El Paso.

Mildred played the saxophone in the band and marched in the Sun Bowl Parade. She was also the manager of the Douglass High School basketball team. She won a scholarship to Tillotson College in Austin Texas and transferred to Southern University in Baton Rouge, La to study business administration. When pledging to a sorority she learned that her friend could not pledge due to her darker skin color and immediately withdrew her application and asked Mary McLeod Bethune to come to campus to help change this discriminatory policy, which succeeded. Mildred moved to Portsmouth, Virginia and was hired to work as registrar and secretary to the president of Norfolk division of Virginia State College, now Norfolk State University.

Mildred returned to El Paso Texas and gave birth to 3 girls between 1946 and 1952 – Congresswoman Barbara Lee, Mrs. Mildred Whitfield and Mrs. Beverly Hardy. She broke many racial barriers as the first African American to be hired in key positions. She worked at the USO and was the first Black clerical worker at Ft. Bliss Texas in the Postal Locator. While working, she attended Texas Western College (now the University of Texas at El Paso) and was one of 7 students to integrate Texas Western. Mildred was an active member of the Easter Star Lodge, Phyllis Wheatley Club and the NAACP and Myrtle Ave Methodist Church.

In 1960 Mildred moved to San Fernando Calif where once again, she broke many racial barriers in the workplace as the first African American to work at the Raymond Lamp Company, Assistant Manager of Lerner Dress store in Panorama City, Calif and Manager of the Rembrandt Sign Co in San Fernando, Calif. and the Veterans Administration Hospital in Sylmar, Calif. At one point Mildred worked three jobs to take care of her aging father and 3 daughters.

In 1975 Mildred moved to Oakland California and worked for the Social Security Administration until her retirement in 1986. Upon her retirement, she helped found and manage her daughter, Barbara Lee’s business, Lee Associates, dba the WC Parish Co. until her second retirement in 1998 when she moved to Sun City, Arizona until 2010.

Mildred enjoys traveling and has visited Greece, Italy, Spain, Hawaii, The Bahamas, Mexico, Grenada, St. Maarten, Virgin Islands, Martha’s Vineyard, and loves to shop. She is intrigued with the beauty of butterflies and has a wonderful collection of butterfly ornaments and personal items, which bring her a lot of joy.

Mildred Massey currently lives at Grand lake Gardens in Oakland California and is Congresswoman Barbara Lee’s biggest supporter. She loves music and basketball and is a frequent attendee at the Oakland Symphony. Mildred Massey has adopted Allen Temple Baptist Church as her church home and appreciates the love and support of Pastor Emeritus J. Alfred Smith Sr., Pastor J. Alfred Smith Jr. and the entire Allen Temple Church family.

Mildred is proud of her 3 daughters, 7 grandchildren, 16 great grand children and 1 great, great grandchild.

(All information above was current until her death)

Congresswoman Barbara Lee’s mother Mildred Parish Massey, 90, passed away peacefully in Oakland, surrounded by family, on Monday, Feb. 16, 2015.



Central / Five Points, (1940 - 1949), Family and Friends

  • Mildred Parish Massey
  • Barbara Lee

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Young girl sitting during the Douglass Historical Marker Dedication.

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Cultural Heritage

  • Douglass High School

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Dr. Maceo Dailey with others who gathered at the Douglass Historical Marker Dedication.

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Cultural Heritage

  • Douglass
  • Historical Marker
  • Dedication
  • Historical Marker
  • Dedication

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Douglass Historical Marker Dedication
Historians, dignitaries, EPISD officials and even former students gathered at the corner of Kansas Street and Fourth Avenue to celebrate the unveiling of the new Texas Historical marker on the building that once housed Douglass Grammar and High School — El Paso’s school for African American students.

The unveiling of the marker on April 18 places the site of the original school places Douglass as one of the places in El Paso with significant historical value.

“The marker is incredibly important as our students are distanced from major events within the African American community their horizons are limited,” said Dr. Maceo Dailey, director of the University of Texas at El Paso African American Studies. “This school was probably one of the best in the country at taking students in and moving them to a level where they had the cognitive tools to go on, but they were also appreciative of their history.”
http://www.episd.org/public_relations/news_detail.php?id=2055



Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Cultural Heritage

  • Douglass High School
  • Douglass Grammar School
  • Douglass Grammar School

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Doris Gary in front of historical marker during the dedication for Douglass Grammar and High School Marker.

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Cultural Heritage

  • Douglass High School

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Photo: McCall Neighborhood Center Manager Barbara Byrd and Doris Gary.

This building is the original Douglass Grammar and High School, which severed El Paso's African-American community from 1891 to 1920. It was named in honor of America's most famous abolitionist, Frederick Douglass. El Paso established a segregated public school system in the 1880's and located its educational building for African-American students in the heart of the Black Community. Douglass opened as a grammar school in 1891. By 1896 the curriculum has expanded to include high school classes as well as foreign languages and music, African-Americans found employment in the railroad, smelting, retail and service industries. As Black families prospered, they moved into middle and upper middle class homes in the Five Points area and petitioned the city to provide a school closer to their new neighborhoods. In 1920, a new Douglass Grammar and High School was completed on Eucalyptus Street and the original Douglass School was sold. The new Douglass School served the city's African-American community from 1920 to 1956, when desegregated its school system. Today, Douglass is an Elementary School. Prior to desegregation, the teachers and students at Douglass faced many hardships, including lower salaries and inferior school equipment and supplies. Despite the discrimination, the principals and teachers were well educated and extraordinarily dedicated to their students. Many graduates went on to become successful surgeons, engineers, pharmacists, athletes, artists and educators. Douglass Grammar and High School is a symbol of the "Jim Crow" era of institutional discrimination, but it is also an example of the self-help philosophy that forged a unified African-American Community and provided the city's black children with lifeline to higher education.
http://douglass.episd.org/news/what_s_new/douglass_historical_marker_dedication

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Cultural Heritage

  • Douglass High School
  • Douglass Grammar School
  • Barbara Byrd
  • Doris Gary
  • women

Tag Women

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Historians, dignitaries, EPISD officials and even former students gathered at the corner of Kansas Street and Fourth Avenue to celebrate the unveiling of the new Texas Historical marker on the building that once housed Douglass Grammar and High School — El Paso’s school for African American students. Pictured is former City Council member Rhodes in hat in El Paso, TX circa 2015.

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Cultural Heritage

  • Douglass High School

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Cephus S. "Dusty" Rhodes and his wife( Rebecca Rhodes) at the Douglass Historical Marker Dedication in El Paso, TX.Mr. Rhodes served on city council.

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Cultural Heritage

  • Douglass High School
  • African American

wife is Rebecca Rhodes tag African American

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Douglass Grammar and High School Historical Marker Ceremony.

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Cultural Heritage

  • Douglass Grammar and High School

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Douglass Grammar and High School Historical Marker

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Cultural Heritage

  • Douglass Grammar and High School

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Douglass Grammar and High School --students who still attend Douglass Grammar School.

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Cultural Heritage

  • Douglass Grammar and High School

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Douglass Grammar and High School --students who still attend Douglass Grammar School. Photograph taken at the ceremony for Douglass Grammar and High School Historical Marker presentation.

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Cultural Heritage

  • Douglass Grammar and High School

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Douglass Grammar and High School historical marker ceremony. Students from Douglass Grammar School attend the ceremony for the schools historical marker.

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Cultural Heritage

  • Douglass Grammar and High School

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Douglass Grammar and High School historical marker ceremony. Students from the school attend the ceremony.

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Cultural Heritage

  • Douglass Grammar and High School

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Students who now attend Douglass Grammar School are present for the ceremony.

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Cultural Heritage

  • Douglass
  • Douglass Grammar and High School

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Douglass Grammar and High School historical marker ceremony.

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Cultural Heritage

  • Douglass Grammar and High School

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Douglass Grammar and High School historical marker ceremony. Dr. Dailey is to the left of the image. Dr. Dailey is Associate Professor at the History Department and Director of African American Studies at the University of Texas at El Paso.

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Cultural Heritage

  • Douglass Grammar and High School
  • African American

Dr. Daily taught African American Studies at UTEP tag African American

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Attended Crescent Beauty School in Austin, Texas in 1940-1941. She worked in that field for many years. Later she worked...

Douglass High School - Dupree Austin Jr. - 1940

Dupree Austin worked in various jobs in El Paso until 1942 when he started working at the Post Office as...

Douglass High School - Mayme L. Taylor Witherspoon - 1939

Married Cornell Witherspoon in 1941. After her hus­band's military tour, she moved to Stockton, California. She was employed with Federal...

Douglass High School - Edward W. Wright, M.D. - 1939

Graduated from Samuel Houston College in Austin, Texas magna cum laude in 1943. Graduated from Meharry Medical College in 1948....

Douglass High School - Theresa Ursery Brown - 1939

Attended Lincoln Junior College and Coles Voca­tional School in Kansas City, Missouri. Took various ex­tension courses while in Europe as...

Douglass High School - Roscoe Roberts - 1939

Served in the military from 1942-1945. Moved from El Paso to Denver, Colorado in 1960 to accept a job with...

Douglass High School - M. Maxine Kelly Boles - 1939

B.S. Tillotson College, Austin, Texas, 1944; M.A. New Mexico Highlands University, 1952; M.A., New Mexico Highlands University, 1954; Post Graduate...

Douglass High School - Amos Boyd - 1939

Attended Tillotson College, Austin, Texas, 1940-41. Lived and worked at Duncan Airfield, San Antonio, Texas where fighter planes are assembled....

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Class of 1952 - Douglass High School - El Paso, Texas.

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Class of 1938 - Douglass High School

Douglass High School - 1938

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