1/16 Colonel Marie Rodgers - 2014

2/16 Colonel Marie Rodgers - 90th Birthday - 2016

3/16 Marie Rodgers - 90th Birthday - 2016

4/16 Marie Rodgers - 90th Birthday - 2016

5/16 Marie Rodgers - 90th Birthday - 2016

6/16 Marie Rodgers - 90th Birthday - 2016

7/16 Colonel Marie Rodgers - 90th Birthday - 2016

8/16 Colonel Marie Rodgers - 90th Birthday - 2016

9/16 Colonel Marie Rodgers - 90th Birthday - 2016

10/16 Colonel Marie Rodgers - 90th Birthday - 2016

11/16 Colonel Marie Rodgers - 90th Birthday - 2016

12/16 Colonel Marie Rodgers - 90th Birthday - 2016

13/16 Colonel Marie Rodgers - 90th Birthday - 2016

14/16 Colonel Marie Rodgers - 90th Birthday - 2016

15/16 Colonel Marie Rodgers - 90th Birthday - 2016

16/16 Colonel Marie Rodgers - Video - 90th Birthday - 2016

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Colonel Marie Rodgers - Combat Nurse - 2014
Marie Rodgers who was a combat nurse served in the Army Nurse Corp from 1952 until 1978. She left with the rank of Colonel and returned to civilian life to volunteer in the pharmacy at the Veterans Administration hospital in El Paso, Texas. "They unloaded one young man from the evacuation helicopter. Both legs were in a body tourniquet, almost like tights. An IV dripped morphine into his arm. He was quiet, almost peaceful, and did not express pain – probably the morphine. We removed the tight bandage to find both legs practically blown away. Only strips of flesh clung to pieces of bone. We began flushing the wounds, and the doctors went to work on him. He died that night. I think of that to this day, every day. I’ll remember him my whole life." Retired Col. Marie Rodgers related her experience in the 24th Evacuation Hospital at Long Binh, Vietnam in 1966. As a young major, Marie supervised the surgical ward of the hospital. After Vietnam, she returned to Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, D.C. While there, President Lyndon Johnson presented Marie with the Bronze Star for her actions in Vietnam.
http://www.elpasoinc.com/elpasoplus/columns/ac_sanders/article_3e5f41b8-ac3d-11e1-bd94-001a4bcf6878.html

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Commemoration

  • Vietnam
  • Marie Rodgers
  • Women
  • Military

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Photograph - Marie Rodgers reading her birthday cards. Location - American Legion - 2400 Bassett Ave, El Paso, TX 79901

“They unloaded one young man from the evacuation helicopter. Both legs were in a body tourniquet, almost like tights. An IV dripped morphine into his arm. He was quiet, almost peaceful, and did not express pain – probably the morphine. We removed the tight bandage to find both legs practically blown away. Only strips of flesh clung to pieces of bone. We began flushing the wounds, and the doctors went to work on him. He died that night. I think of that to this day, every day. I’ll remember him my whole life.

“But you know who I always think of at those times? That young medic, just a private, who bandaged him up and started the morphine! That soldier would never have made it to the hospital without his actions. Those young PFCs in the field were the real heroes.”

Retired Col. Marie Rodgers related her experience in the 24th Evacuation Hospital at Long Binh, Vietnam in 1966. As a young major, Marie supervised the surgical ward of the hospital. After Vietnam, she returned to Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, D.C. While there, President Lyndon Johnson presented Marie with the Bronze Star for her actions in Vietnam.
http://www.elpasoinc.com/elpasoplus/columns/ac_sanders/article_3e5f41b8-ac3d-11e1-bd94-001a4bcf6878.html

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Celebration

  • African Americans
  • Military
  • Vietnam
  • Marie Rodgers
  • Afro-Americana
  • militar

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They unloaded one young man from the evacuation helicopter. Both legs were in a body tourniquet, almost like tights. An IV dripped morphine into his arm. He was quiet, almost peaceful, and did not express pain – probably the morphine. We removed the tight bandage to find both legs practically blown away. Only strips of flesh clung to pieces of bone. We began flushing the wounds, and the doctors went to work on him. He died that night. I think of that to this day, every day. I’ll remember him my whole life.

“But you know who I always think of at those times? That young medic, just a private, who bandaged him up and started the morphine! That soldier would never have made it to the hospital without his actions. Those young PFCs in the field were the real heroes.”

Retired Col. Marie Rodgers related her experience in the 24th Evacuation Hospital at Long Binh, Vietnam in 1966. As a young major, Marie supervised the surgical ward of the hospital. After Vietnam, she returned to Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, D.C. While there, President Lyndon Johnson presented Marie with the Bronze Star for her actions in Vietnam.
http://www.elpasoinc.com/elpasoplus/columns/ac_sanders/article_3e5f41b8-ac3d-11e1-bd94-001a4bcf6878.html

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Celebration

  • Marie Rodgers
  • Vietnam

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Thank you for your comment

description

They unloaded one young man from the evacuation helicopter. Both legs were in a body tourniquet, almost like tights. An IV dripped morphine into his arm. He was quiet, almost peaceful, and did not express pain – probably the morphine. We removed the tight bandage to find both legs practically blown away. Only strips of flesh clung to pieces of bone. We began flushing the wounds, and the doctors went to work on him. He died that night. I think of that to this day, every day. I’ll remember him my whole life.

“But you know who I always think of at those times? That young medic, just a private, who bandaged him up and started the morphine! That soldier would never have made it to the hospital without his actions. Those young PFCs in the field were the real heroes.”

Retired Col. Marie Rodgers related her experience in the 24th Evacuation Hospital at Long Binh, Vietnam in 1966. As a young major, Marie supervised the surgical ward of the hospital. After Vietnam, she returned to Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, D.C. While there, President Lyndon Johnson presented Marie with the Bronze Star for her actions in Vietnam. http://www.elpasoinc.com/elpasoplus/columns/ac_sanders/article_3e5f41b8-ac3d-11e1-bd94-001a4bcf6878.html

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Celebration

  • Marie Rodgers
  • Vietnam

Your comment will be visible after the El Paso Museum staff has reviewed it. This usually happens within 24 hours.

Thank you for your comment

description

They unloaded one young man from the evacuation helicopter. Both legs were in a body tourniquet, almost like tights. An IV dripped morphine into his arm. He was quiet, almost peaceful, and did not express pain – probably the morphine. We removed the tight bandage to find both legs practically blown away. Only strips of flesh clung to pieces of bone. We began flushing the wounds, and the doctors went to work on him. He died that night. I think of that to this day, every day. I’ll remember him my whole life.

“But you know who I always think of at those times? That young medic, just a private, who bandaged him up and started the morphine! That soldier would never have made it to the hospital without his actions. Those young PFCs in the field were the real heroes.”

Retired Col. Marie Rodgers related her experience in the 24th Evacuation Hospital at Long Binh, Vietnam in 1966. As a young major, Marie supervised the surgical ward of the hospital. After Vietnam, she returned to Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, D.C. While there, President Lyndon Johnson presented Marie with the Bronze Star for her actions in Vietnam. http://www.elpasoinc.com/elpasoplus/columns/ac_sanders/article_3e5f41b8-ac3d-11e1-bd94-001a4bcf6878.html

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Celebration

  • Marie Rodgers
  • Vietnam

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description

They unloaded one young man from the evacuation helicopter. Both legs were in a body tourniquet, almost like tights. An IV dripped morphine into his arm. He was quiet, almost peaceful, and did not express pain – probably the morphine. We removed the tight bandage to find both legs practically blown away. Only strips of flesh clung to pieces of bone. We began flushing the wounds, and the doctors went to work on him. He died that night. I think of that to this day, every day. I’ll remember him my whole life.

“But you know who I always think of at those times? That young medic, just a private, who bandaged him up and started the morphine! That soldier would never have made it to the hospital without his actions. Those young PFCs in the field were the real heroes.”

Retired Col. Marie Rodgers related her experience in the 24th Evacuation Hospital at Long Binh, Vietnam in 1966. As a young major, Marie supervised the surgical ward of the hospital. After Vietnam, she returned to Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, D.C. While there, President Lyndon Johnson presented Marie with the Bronze Star for her actions in Vietnam. http://www.elpasoinc.com/elpasoplus/columns/ac_sanders/article_3e5f41b8-ac3d-11e1-bd94-001a4bcf6878.html

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Celebration

  • Marie Rodgers
  • Vietnam

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Thank you for your comment

description

They unloaded one young man from the evacuation helicopter. Both legs were in a body tourniquet, almost like tights. An IV dripped morphine into his arm. He was quiet, almost peaceful, and did not express pain – probably the morphine. We removed the tight bandage to find both legs practically blown away. Only strips of flesh clung to pieces of bone. We began flushing the wounds, and the doctors went to work on him. He died that night. I think of that to this day, every day. I’ll remember him my whole life.

“But you know who I always think of at those times? That young medic, just a private, who bandaged him up and started the morphine! That soldier would never have made it to the hospital without his actions. Those young PFCs in the field were the real heroes.”

Retired Col. Marie Rodgers related her experience in the 24th Evacuation Hospital at Long Binh, Vietnam in 1966. As a young major, Marie supervised the surgical ward of the hospital. After Vietnam, she returned to Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, D.C. While there, President Lyndon Johnson presented Marie with the Bronze Star for her actions in Vietnam. http://www.elpasoinc.com/elpasoplus/columns/ac_sanders/article_3e5f41b8-ac3d-11e1-bd94-001a4bcf6878.html

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Celebration

  • Marie Rodgers
  • Vietnam
  • Nurse
  • enfermera

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Thank you for your comment

description

They unloaded one young man from the evacuation helicopter. Both legs were in a body tourniquet, almost like tights. An IV dripped morphine into his arm. He was quiet, almost peaceful, and did not express pain – probably the morphine. We removed the tight bandage to find both legs practically blown away. Only strips of flesh clung to pieces of bone. We began flushing the wounds, and the doctors went to work on him. He died that night. I think of that to this day, every day. I’ll remember him my whole life.

“But you know who I always think of at those times? That young medic, just a private, who bandaged him up and started the morphine! That soldier would never have made it to the hospital without his actions. Those young PFCs in the field were the real heroes.”

Retired Col. Marie Rodgers related her experience in the 24th Evacuation Hospital at Long Binh, Vietnam in 1966. As a young major, Marie supervised the surgical ward of the hospital. After Vietnam, she returned to Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, D.C. While there, President Lyndon Johnson presented Marie with the Bronze Star for her actions in Vietnam. http://www.elpasoinc.com/elpasoplus/columns/ac_sanders/article_3e5f41b8-ac3d-11e1-bd94-001a4bcf6878.html

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Celebration

  • Marie Rodgers
  • Vietnam
  • Nurse
  • enfermera

Your comment will be visible after the El Paso Museum staff has reviewed it. This usually happens within 24 hours.

Thank you for your comment

description

They unloaded one young man from the evacuation helicopter. Both legs were in a body tourniquet, almost like tights. An IV dripped morphine into his arm. He was quiet, almost peaceful, and did not express pain – probably the morphine. We removed the tight bandage to find both legs practically blown away. Only strips of flesh clung to pieces of bone. We began flushing the wounds, and the doctors went to work on him. He died that night. I think of that to this day, every day. I’ll remember him my whole life.

“But you know who I always think of at those times? That young medic, just a private, who bandaged him up and started the morphine! That soldier would never have made it to the hospital without his actions. Those young PFCs in the field were the real heroes.”

Retired Col. Marie Rodgers related her experience in the 24th Evacuation Hospital at Long Binh, Vietnam in 1966. As a young major, Marie supervised the surgical ward of the hospital. After Vietnam, she returned to Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, D.C. While there, President Lyndon Johnson presented Marie with the Bronze Star for her actions in Vietnam. http://www.elpasoinc.com/elpasoplus/columns/ac_sanders/article_3e5f41b8-ac3d-11e1-bd94-001a4bcf6878.html

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Celebration

  • Marie Rodgers
  • Vietnam
  • Nurse
  • enfermera

Your comment will be visible after the El Paso Museum staff has reviewed it. This usually happens within 24 hours.

Thank you for your comment

description

They unloaded one young man from the evacuation helicopter. Both legs were in a body tourniquet, almost like tights. An IV dripped morphine into his arm. He was quiet, almost peaceful, and did not express pain – probably the morphine. We removed the tight bandage to find both legs practically blown away. Only strips of flesh clung to pieces of bone. We began flushing the wounds, and the doctors went to work on him. He died that night. I think of that to this day, every day. I’ll remember him my whole life.

“But you know who I always think of at those times? That young medic, just a private, who bandaged him up and started the morphine! That soldier would never have made it to the hospital without his actions. Those young PFCs in the field were the real heroes.”

Retired Col. Marie Rodgers related her experience in the 24th Evacuation Hospital at Long Binh, Vietnam in 1966. As a young major, Marie supervised the surgical ward of the hospital. After Vietnam, she returned to Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, D.C. While there, President Lyndon Johnson presented Marie with the Bronze Star for her actions in Vietnam. http://www.elpasoinc.com/elpasoplus/columns/ac_sanders/article_3e5f41b8-ac3d-11e1-bd94-001a4bcf6878.html

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Celebration

  • Marie Rodgers
  • Vietnam
  • Nurse

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Friends and family celebrate Colonel Marie Rodgers 90th birthday party.

hey unloaded one young man from the evacuation helicopter. Both legs were in a body tourniquet, almost like tights. An IV dripped morphine into his arm. He was quiet, almost peaceful, and did not express pain – probably the morphine. We removed the tight bandage to find both legs practically blown away. Only strips of flesh clung to pieces of bone. We began flushing the wounds, and the doctors went to work on him. He died that night. I think of that to this day, every day. I’ll remember him my whole life.

“But you know who I always think of at those times? That young medic, just a private, who bandaged him up and started the morphine! That soldier would never have made it to the hospital without his actions. Those young PFCs in the field were the real heroes.”

Retired Col. Marie Rodgers related her experience in the 24th Evacuation Hospital at Long Binh, Vietnam in 1966. As a young major, Marie supervised the surgical ward of the hospital. After Vietnam, she returned to Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, D.C. While there, President Lyndon Johnson presented Marie with the Bronze Star for her actions in Vietnam. http://www.elpasoinc.com/elpasoplus/columns/ac_sanders/article_3e5f41b8-ac3d-11e1-bd94-001a4bcf6878.html

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Celebration

  • Marie Rodgers
  • Vietnam
  • Nurse
  • enfermera

Your comment will be visible after the El Paso Museum staff has reviewed it. This usually happens within 24 hours.

Thank you for your comment

description

Friends and family celebrate Colonel Marie Rodgers 90th birthday party.

“They unloaded one young man from the evacuation helicopter. Both legs were in a body tourniquet, almost like tights. An IV dripped morphine into his arm. He was quiet, almost peaceful, and did not express pain – probably the morphine. We removed the tight bandage to find both legs practically blown away. Only strips of flesh clung to pieces of bone. We began flushing the wounds, and the doctors went to work on him. He died that night. I think of that to this day, every day. I’ll remember him my whole life.

“But you know who I always think of at those times? That young medic, just a private, who bandaged him up and started the morphine! That soldier would never have made it to the hospital without his actions. Those young PFCs in the field were the real heroes.”

Retired Col. Marie Rodgers related her experience in the 24th Evacuation Hospital at Long Binh, Vietnam in 1966. As a young major, Marie supervised the surgical ward of the hospital. After Vietnam, she returned to Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, D.C. While there, President Lyndon Johnson presented Marie with the Bronze Star for her actions in Vietnam.

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Celebration

  • Marie Rodgers
  • Vietnam
  • Nurse
  • enfermera

tag women

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Thank you for your comment

description

"They unloaded one young man from the evacuation helicopter. Both legs were in a body tourniquet, almost like tights. An IV dripped morphine into his arm. He was quiet, almost peaceful, and did not express pain – probably the morphine. We removed the tight bandage to find both legs practically blown away. Only strips of flesh clung to pieces of bone. We began flushing the wounds, and the doctors went to work on him. He died that night. I think of that to this day, every day. I’ll remember him my whole life.

“But you know who I always think of at those times? That young medic, just a private, who bandaged him up and started the morphine! That soldier would never have made it to the hospital without his actions. Those young PFCs in the field were the real heroes.”

Retired Col. Marie Rodgers related her experience in the 24th Evacuation Hospital at Long Binh, Vietnam in 1966. As a young major, Marie supervised the surgical ward of the hospital. After Vietnam, she returned to Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, D.C. While there, President Lyndon Johnson presented Marie with the Bronze Star for her actions in Vietnam.

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Celebration

  • Marie Rodgers
  • Vietnam
  • Nurse
  • enfermera

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Thank you for your comment

description

Colonel Marie Rodgers - location - American Legion - 2400 Bassett Ave, El Paso, TX 79901

Colonel Marie Rodgers celebrates her 90th birthday at the American Legion.

“They unloaded one young man from the evacuation helicopter. Both legs were in a body tourniquet, almost like tights. An IV dripped morphine into his arm. He was quiet, almost peaceful, and did not express pain – probably the morphine. We removed the tight bandage to find both legs practically blown away. Only strips of flesh clung to pieces of bone. We began flushing the wounds, and the doctors went to work on him. He died that night. I think of that to this day, every day. I’ll remember him my whole life.

“But you know who I always think of at those times? That young medic, just a private, who bandaged him up and started the morphine! That soldier would never have made it to the hospital without his actions. Those young PFCs in the field were the real heroes.”

Retired Col. Marie Rodgers related her experience in the 24th Evacuation Hospital at Long Binh, Vietnam in 1966. As a young major, Marie supervised the surgical ward of the hospital. After Vietnam, she returned to Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, D.C. While there, President Lyndon Johnson presented Marie with the Bronze Star for her actions in Vietnam.

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Celebration

  • Marie Rodgers
  • Vietnam
  • Nurse
  • Korea
  • enfermera
  • African American
  • Women

tag women African American

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description

“They unloaded one young man from the evacuation helicopter. Both legs were in a body tourniquet, almost like tights. An IV dripped morphine into his arm. He was quiet, almost peaceful, and did not express pain – probably the morphine. We removed the tight bandage to find both legs practically blown away. Only strips of flesh clung to pieces of bone. We began flushing the wounds, and the doctors went to work on him. He died that night. I think of that to this day, every day. I’ll remember him my whole life.

“But you know who I always think of at those times? That young medic, just a private, who bandaged him up and started the morphine! That soldier would never have made it to the hospital without his actions. Those young PFCs in the field were the real heroes.”

Retired Col. Marie Rodgers related her experience in the 24th Evacuation Hospital at Long Binh, Vietnam in 1966. As a young major, Marie supervised the surgical ward of the hospital. After Vietnam, she returned to Walter Reed Hospital in Washington, D.C. While there, President Lyndon Johnson presented Marie with the Bronze Star for her actions in Vietnam.

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Celebration

  • Marie Rodgers
  • Vietnam
  • Nurse
  • enfermera

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Thank you for your comment

description

Colonel Marie Rodgers - Video - 90th Birthday - 2016

Marie Rodgers who was a combat nurse served in the Army Nurse Corp from 1952 until 1978. She left with the rank of Colonel and returned to civilian life to volunteer in the pharmacy at the Veterans Administration hospital in El Paso, Texas.

Central / Chamizal, (2010 - 2019), Celebration

  • Marie Rodgers
  • Combat Nurse
  • Vietnam
  • Korean
  • Video
  • combate
  • enfermera

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