1/20 Buffalo Soldiers Of The 10th Calvary - Mexican Revolution

2/20 Headquarters of F. I. Madero (Casa Adobe)

3/20 Barricade on Commercial Street, Juarez

4/20 Pancho Villa with Rebels

5/20 Mexican Revolution

6/20 Mexican Revolution

7/20 Mexican Revolution

8/20 Soldiers During The Mexican Revolution

9/20 Pancho Villa in 1911

10/20 Santa Fe Bridge 1911 - El Paso, Texas

11/20 Pancho Villa

12/20 Toltec Club in 1910s

13/20 Federals Presenting Dead Rebels

14/20 Portrait of Porfirio Diaz

15/20 Merrick Building 1910s - El Paso, Texas

16/20 Soldiers after Raid

17/20 Battle of Ciudad Juárez - 1911

18/20 The 24th Returning From Mexico

19/20 Buffalo Soldiers - 10th Cavalry

20/20 Revolutionary Camp

description

Photo: Returning soldier who where captured during the Mexican Revolution's Punitive Expedition.
Buffalo Soldiers of the 10th Cavalry who were taken prisoner during the attack on Carrizal.

In June, Pershing received intelligence that Villa was at Carrizal, in the state of Chihuahua. He selected Captains Charles T. Boyd and Lewis S. Morey to lead approximately 100 soldiers from Troops C and K of the 10th Cavalry to investigate. They encountered 400 Mexican Army troops, or Carrancistas, instead of Pancho Villa’s men. The Mexican soldiers told the Americans to turn back northward. Captain Boyd refused and ordered his men south through the town anyway, which caused shots to be fired. Both sides suffered large losses. Captain Boyd and 10 soldiers were killed and another 24 were taken prisoner. Twenty-four Mexican soldiers were killed, including their commanding officer General Felix Gomez, and 43 were wounded.

General Pershing was furious at this result and asked for permission to attack the Carrancista garrison at Chihuahua. President Wilson, fearing that such an attack would provoke a full-scale war with Mexico, refused. The Battle of Carrizal marked the effective end of the Mexican Expedition, which failed in both its missions. Pancho Villa survived, and small raids on American soil occurred while the expedition was in Mexico.
http://www.blackpast.org/aah/battle-carrizal-1916

Central / Old Ft. Bliss, (1910 - 1919), Conflict

  • 10th Calvary
  • Military
  • Buffalo Soldiers
  • soldiers
  • Old Ft. Bliss
  • Black Soldiers
  • African American

tag African American soldiers

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The notation on the back of the image says: " Across the Rio Grande River from Smelter 1911" - Inside the image a slip of paper says: '"Casa of Adobe" Cuartel General de Francisco I. Madero' (Translation: ""House of Adobe" Headquarters of Francisco I. Madero"')
Consequently, the picture shows the headquarters of Francisco I. Madero, one of the rebel leaders in the Mexican Revolution. He became president of Mexico in 1911 but was assassinated two years later. Four men are sitting down against the wall under a window - three of them with rifles; the other with his hat on his knee. There's another man standing with his rifle to his side. On the right of the image a man is sitting on a ladder. All the men are unknown.

Out of Area / Out of Area, (1910 - 1919), Conflict

  • Mexican Revolution
  • Madero

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The picture was taken at Calle de Comercio, Juarez, during the Mexican Revolution.
Five men - they seem to be quite young - are standing behind the barricade, blocking the road and pointing their guns towards the camera. The barricade is made out of wood, sand bags, rocks and tree trunks,
The sign of one of the buildings on the right says Carpentry and Blacksmith by Fidel San. The street is also marked by many poles. The building to the right is partly burned.

Central / Downtown, (1910 - 1919), Conflict

  • Mexican Revolution
  • Juarez

think this should be in conflict not fun theme

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Notation on image:(back)--"Jesus Villa, Meudola, Medero, brother Gustave & one other, Gorneg, Juarez Mex."
Visible: 15 men are visible in the picture--12 out of the 15 are clearly on horseback. Most of them have rifles--the rebel on the far left of the image has a sword. In the background a building is visible. Wheel marks are on the road in front of the revolutionaries. Pancho Villa is on horseback to the left of image. Fourth from left on horseback.

Out of Area / Out of Area, (1910 - 1919), Revolution

  • Pancho Villa
  • Mexican Revolution

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Written on the image: "House where General Tamborel was killed."
Visible: Two men well dressed, one of them has a cane, the other is carrying a box or book. Two women well dressed in white with hats. One has a black hat, the other a white hat with flowers. Also, a boy well dressed-- in the background a building full of holes from bullets.

Out of Area / Ciudad Juarez, (1910 - 1919), Revolution

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In the photograph, there are bullet riddles on the adobe home all threw out the surface. In front of the of the adobe home there are unidentified individuals in shock to their shattered home.

Out of Area / Out of Area, (1910 - 1919), Revolution

  • Mexican Revolution
  • mexico

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description

Outside of the prison.

Out of Area / Ciudad Juarez, (1910 - 1919), Conflict

  • Mexican Revolution

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Notation on front of image: "Villa"
Visible: Four men riding horses down a road--two of them carrying swords. The other two carrying rifles. Villa is written with the man carrying the flag---question whether this is "Pancho Villa". The man carrying the flag is Roque Gonzales Garza --not Pancho Villa. The soldier second from left on horseback is Raul Madero--with the four on horseback in the front. With the Mexican flag, colonel Roque González Garza progresses proud improvised during a parade to celebrate the victory of Ciudad Juárez (wrongly identified here appears as Villa). The escort at the front four horsemen led by the greater Raul Madero (second from left to right).

Out of Area / Out of Area, (1910 - 1919), Revolution

  • Pancho Villa
  • Mexican Revolution
  • revolutionaries
  • Battle of Juarez

this issseweeeeet

Yes--this is a great photograph.

cool cowboys

Not cowboys ---but soldiers during the mexican revolution. Between 1910 - 1919.

Changes made ---thank you.

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Notation on image: (back) Villa Juarez, Mex 1912
Visible: Two horses are visible --on the right side, Pancho Villa is mounted on one of the horses. In the back of Pancho Villa a man is standing with a white coat. Other men are on the left side. Some horses are visible in the background. Mountains are also visible in the background. Note-- included with image from Miguel Angel Berumen---it says "Villa En 1911".

Pancho Villa (1978-1923) was a Mexican revolutionary leader who advocated for the poor. Though he was a killer and a bandit, many remember him as a folk hero.
Born into a poor family, he learned the gap between the rich and the poor in Mexico in the end of the 19th century the hard way. After having shot the owner of the hacienda on which his family lived and worked with the age of 16, Villa ran from the law and became the leader of a group of bandits.
Because of his skills as a guerilla fighter, he caught the attention of men who were planning a revolution. Since Porfirio Diaz, the sitting president of Mexico, had created much of the current problems for the poor and Francisco Madero promised change for the lower classes, Pancho Villa joined Madero and became an effective leader in the revolutionary army from October 1910 to May 1911. Together with Madero and Pascual Orozco, he commanded the troops during the Battle of Juarez, which led to the resignation of Porfirio Diaz. However, in May 1911, he resigned from command because of differences he had with Orozco.
Villa married Maria Luz Corral and tried to settle down. When Orozco started a new rebellion against Madero, who had become Mexican President, Villa supported Madero together with General Victoriano Huerta. When Huerta became a Madero adversary and eventually killed him to claim the presidency for himself, Villa allied himself with Venustiano Carranza to fight against Huerta.
Pancho Villa was extremely successful, but in the summer of 1914, Villa and Carranza, became enemies and fought against each other for the next several years. The United States supported Carranza, which is why Villa attacked the town of Columbus, New Mexico, in 1916. His attack was the first on American soil since 1812. Under the leadership of General Pershing, the U.S. sent thousands of soldiers across the border to hunt for Pancho Villa (Punitive Expedition), but they never caught him.
When Adolfo De la Huerta became the interim president of Mexico in 1920, Villa agreed to retire from revolutionary life but was gunned down in 1923.

Out of Area / Ciudad Juarez, (1910 - 1919), Conflict

  • Pancho Villa
  • Mexican Revolution
  • Battle of Juarez
  • revolutionary

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The picture shows Santa Fe Street bridge, which connected El Paso, Texas and Ciudad Juárez, after a snow storm in 1911. American soldiers were patrolling the border as a result of the Mexican troubles due to the Mexican Revolution. The Santa Fe bridge had been erected in 1887 and was replaced in 1927. One can see the streetcar rails, connecting the people of the two cities.

Collection:: Aultman Collection

Central / Downtown, (1910 - 1919), Borders

  • Mexican Revolution
  • downtown
  • Aultman

add the word Texas after "El Paso' in first sentence of description tag Aultman

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The portrait shows Francisco "Pancho" Villa, dressed in military attire, circa 1914.
Pancho Villa (1878-1923) was a Mexican revolutionary leader who advocated for the poor. Though he was a killer and a bandit, many remember him as a folk hero.
Born into a poor family, he learned the gap between the rich and the poor in Mexico in the end of the 19th century the hard way. After having shot the owner of the hacienda on which his family lived and worked with the age of 16, Villa ran from the law and became the leader of a group of bandits.
Because of his skills as a guerilla fighter, he caught the attention of men who were planning a revolution. Since Porfirio Diaz, the sitting president of Mexico, had created much of the current problems for the poor and Francisco Madero promised change for the lower classes, Pancho Villa joined Madero and became an effective leader in the revolutionary army from October 1910 to May 1911. Together with Madero and Pascual Orozco, he commanded the troops during the Battle of Juarez, which led to the resignation of Porfirio Diaz. However, in May 1911, he resigned from command because of differences he had with Orozco.
Villa married Maria Luz Corral and tried to settle down. When Orozco started a new rebellion against Madero, who had become Mexican President, Villa supported Madero together with General Victoriano Huerta. When Huerta became a Madero adversary and eventually killed him to claim the presidency for himself, Villa allied himself with Venustiano Carranza to fight against Huerta.
Pancho Villa was extremely successful, but in the summer of 1914, Villa and Carranza, became enemies and fought against each other for the next several years. The United States supported Carranza, which is why Villa attacked the town of Columbus, New Mexico, in 1916. His attack was the first on American soil since 1812. Under the leadership of General Pershing, the U.S. sent thousands of soldiers across the border to hunt for Pancho Villa (Punitive Expedition), but they never caught him.
When Adolfo De la Huerta became the interim president of Mexico in 1920, Villa agreed to retire from revolutionary life but was gunned down in 1923.

Collection:: Aultman Collection

Out of Area / Ciudad Juarez, (1910 - 1919), Revolution

  • Mexican Revolution

la fecha de nacimiento de pancho villa es incorrecta

Gracias--entró en fecha correcta del nacimiento de Panch Villa.

My grandmother was good friends with Pancho Villa.

le gusto la mustach

ariba!!

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When the building was completed in 1910, the Toltec Club was considered the finest social gathering place in El Paso. From 1911 through 1930, the vast majority of political and business decisions affecting El Paso were made there, and every prominent guest to the area was entertained in El Paso’s Toltec Club. Its purpose was underlined by the name; "Toltec" meaning "man of knowledge". The Club also played a prominent role in the Mexican Revolution. Peace negotiation were carried out there and the victory banquet for Francisco I. Madero after the Battle of Juarez also took place in the building. Other guests were also honored there, amongst them former President Theodore Roosevelt and John J. Pershing. However, America’s economic collapse during the Great Depression caused the members of the Toltec Club to close its doors in 1930.
The historically significant Renaissance/ Beaux Arts architectural style, engineered by J. J. Huddart, and the vastly significant social and political functions that took place inside its doors allowed it to be recorded in the National Register of Historic Places in 1979. After the Club disbanded, the Toltec Building became the home of several businesses.

Collection:: Aultman Collection

Central / Magoffin, (1910 - 1919), Politics

  • Architecture
  • Landmark
  • Recreation
  • Business
  • Magoffin
  • Magoffin

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The picture was taken during the Mexican Revolution. It shows a group of federals, who are presenting dead rebels. It appears that they are in a cemetery.

Collection:: Aultman Collection

Out of Area / Out of Area, (1910 - 1919), Revolution

  • Mexican Revolution

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This portrait of Porfirio Diaz is from the 1910s. Diaz served as Mexican President for several terms between 1876 and 1911. He is a controversial figure, having brought internal stability on one hand but repressing his critics on the other hand. Diaz was overthrown during the Mexican Revolution and fled to Spain. He died in Paris in 1915.

Collection:: Aultman Collection

Central / Downtown, (1910 - 1919), Politics

  • Mexican Revolution
  • Personalities
  • downtown
  • downtown

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The picture shows the Merrick building during the 1910s. It housed the St. Charles Hotel on the 2nd and 3rd floor and the Shelton Payne Arms Company on the first floor (until 1931). The store was a major arms dealer during the Mexican Revolution. The Merrick building was built in 1887 and was designed as a typical Victorian style brick home. Located on El Paso Street, it now houses stores and apartments.

Collection:: Aultman Collection

Central / Downtown, (1910 - 1919), Business

  • Architecture
  • Landmarks
  • Mexican Revolution
  • downtown

march 12th 2015, the building still looks exactly the same! -current resident

haunted... bad vibes

Title should include in El Paso, Texas

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The picture shows a group of soldiers after a raid. It was probably taken during the Mexican Revolution. The soldiers are pointing their arms towards three captives, who are sitting on the floor.

Collection:: Aultman Collection

Out of Area / Out of Area, (1910 - 1919), Revolution

  • Mexican Revolution
  • raid
  • soldiers
  • captives

should have gotten yoked.

swag

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Army Captain during the Battle of Ciudad Juarez.

Out of Area / Out of Area, (1910 - 1919), Revolution

  • Battle of Juarez
  • Mexican Revolution
  • army
  • captain

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"24th---Just From Mexico" June 16, 1919" is the writing on the image. The Third Battle of Ciudad Juarez, or simply the Battle of Juarez, was the final major battle involving the rebels of Francisco "Pancho" Villa. It began on June 15, 1919 when Villa attempted to capture the border city of Ciudad Juarez from the Mexican Army. During the engagement, the Villistas provoked an intervention by the United States Army forces protecting the neighboring city of El Paso, Texas. The Americans routed the Villistas in what became the second largest battle of the Mexican Revolution involving the United States, and the last battle of the Border War. With the American army closing in, the Villistas had no choice but to retreat. Pancho Villa then attacked Durango but lost again so he retired to his home at Parral, Chihuahua in 1920, with a full pardon from the Carrancista government.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Ciudad_Ju%C3%A1rez_(1919)

Central / Downtown, (1910 - 1919), Revolution

  • Borders
  • 24th
  • Third Battle of Ciudad Juarez
  • downtown
  • downtown

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Buffalo Soldiers of the U.S. 10th Cavalry Regiment who were taken prisoner during the Battle of Carrizal, Chihuahua, Mexico in 1916. This picture was taken upon their release. African American soldiers returning home.

Central / Downtown, (1910 - 1919), Revolution

  • Buffalo Soldiers
  • revolution

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Looking from Madero's Camp to the American side.

Collection:: J.W. Lorentzen Collection

Accession no:: H1999.025.006

Central / Smeltertown, (1910 - 1919), Conflict

  • Mexican Revolution
  • ASARCO
  • J.W. Lorentzen

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