1/18 Francisco Madero With Newsmen

2/18 Banquet Offered By General Orozco - 1912

3/18 Association of Don Porfirio Diaz - 1918

4/18 Association of Don Porfirio Diaz - 1918

5/18 U.S. Army Travelling with Wagons

6/18 Carranza on Horse

7/18 Mexican Revolution

8/18 Pancho Villa and his Men

9/18 Orozco's Camp

10/18 Francisco I. Madero and his Wife Sara Pérez

11/18 Long Tom

12/18 Orozco and Two of His Fighters

13/18 Castillo and Madero

14/18 Francisco I. Madero

15/18 Porfirio Diaz

16/18 Pancho Villa on Horse

17/18 General John J. Pershing

18/18 Francisco I. Madero

description

Portrait of F. Madero with newsmen. Left to right: Felix Summerfield, Francisco Madero, Allie Martin, and a photographer standing in front of an adobe building.

Accession no:: 034-2001-003-EPCHS

Out of Area / Ciudad Juarez, (1910 - 1919), Revolution

  • Francisco I. Madero
  • Mexican Revolution

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Banquet Offered By General Pascual Orozco - to Juan Sarabia.

Out of Area / Out of Area, (1910 - 1919), Revolution

  • revolution
  • revolucion
  • Mexican Revolution

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description

Liberty Hall - left to right seated #4 Mother Guadalupe Morales

Picture identified on the back as Liberty Hall. Little girl with ribbon - Mother Guadalupe Morales.

Central / Downtown, (1910 - 1919), Revolution

  • revolution
  • revolucion
  • Mexican Revolution

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Liberty Hall is the location - Jesus G. Morales - Father of Mother Guadalupe Morales.

Central / Downtown, (1910 - 1919), Revolution

  • revolution
  • revolucion
  • Mexican Revolution

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description

This shows how the military traveled during this time. In the background --the Fall Mansion. The two-story Classical Revival mansion was home to Albert Bacon Fall, Secretary of the Interior under President Warren G. Harding. Fall was convicted of accepting a bribe during the Teapot Dome Scandal, and the term “fall guy”originates from his role. The house incorporated colossal white columns from Fall’s boyhood home in Kentucky. Located in El Paso's historic district.

http://www.preservationtexas.org/endangered/albert-fall-mansion/

Collection:: Aultman Collection

Central / El Paso High, (1910 - 1919), Military

  • Mexican Revolution
  • El Paso High

This is a great picture!

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The image shows José Venustiano Carranza Garza on his horse. He was one of the leaders of the Mexican Revolution. He ultimately became President of Mexico following the overthrow of the dictatorial Victoriano Huerta regime in the summer of 1914, and during his administration the current constitution of Mexico was drafted. He was assassinated near the end of his term.

Collection:: Aultman Collection

Out of Area / Ciudad Juarez, (1910 - 1919), Revolution

  • Mexican Revolution
  • Politics

el senor esta en su caballo

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description

Brauilo Hernandez--Abraham Gonzalez-Madero--Pascual Orozco. Men standing on a sidewalk in a town. The two men on the left have cameras.

Out of Area / Out of Area, (1910 - 1919), Revolution

  • Mexican Revolution

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The image shows Pancho Villa and his men. Villa is the fourth man from the right in the front row.
Pancho Villa (1878-1923) was a Mexican revolutionary leader who advocated for the poor. Though he was a killer and a bandit, many remember him as a folk hero.
Born into a poor family, he learned the gap between the rich and the poor in Mexico in the end of the 19th century the hard way. After having shot the owner of the hacienda on which his family lived and worked with the age of 16, Villa ran from the law and became the leader of a group of bandits.
Because of his skills as a guerilla fighter, he caught the attention of men who were planning a revolution. Since Porfirio Diaz, the sitting president of Mexico, had created much of the current problems for the poor and Francisco Madero promised change for the lower classes, Pancho Villa joined Madero and became an effective leader in the revolutionary army from October 1910 to May 1911. Together with Madero and Pascual Orozco, he commanded the troops during the Battle of Juarez, which led to the resignation of Porfirio Diaz. However, in May 1911, he resigned from command because of differences he had with Orozco.
Villa married Maria Luz Corral and tried to settle down. When Orozco started a new rebellion against Madero, who had become Mexican President, Villa supported Madero together with General Victoriano Huerta. When Huerta became a Madero adversary and eventually killed him to claim the presidency for himself, Villa allied himself with Venustiano Carranza to fight against Huerta.
Pancho Villa was extremely successful, but in the summer of 1914, Villa and Carranza, became enemies and fought against each other for the next several years. The United States supported Carranza, which is why Villa attacked the town of Columbus, New Mexico, in 1916. His attack was the first on American soil since 1812. Under the leadership of General Pershing, the U.S. sent thousands of soldiers across the border to hunt for Pancho Villa (Punitive Expedition), but they never caught him.
When Adolfo De la Huerta became the interim president of Mexico in 1920, Villa agreed to retire from revolutionary life but was gunned down in 1923.

Collection:: Franklin Lee Cleavenger

Accession no:: PH070-05--39

Out of Area / Out of Area, (1910 - 1919), Revolution

  • Pancho Villa
  • Mexican Revolution

Franklin Lee Cleavenger passion was taking photos while living in Chihuahua Mexico when he was assigned as a Superintendent to start up the Telephonos de Chihuahua telephone company after moving with his family from Kansas. He often encountered Pancho Villa and his men during the Mexico Revolution while fixing telephone wires that were cut to prevent him from being captured. To view and learn more about Franklin Lee Cleavenger, search the UTEP Special Collections library to see more of his photos.

hola la gente

maybe a typo in pancho`s birthdate: 1878?

Correction made --thank you.

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description

The picture shows a group of rebels in Orozco's camp. Pascual Orozco Vazquez was one of the leaders of the Mexican Revolution. Together with Pancho Villa he commanded Madero's army during the First Battle of Ciudad Juárez. The image highlights two figures in this group, Eduardo Hay and Giuseppe Garibaldi:
Eduardo Hay was a Mexican general, diplomat and politician. He was one of the founding members of the political party Partido Nacional Antireeleccionista, which was launched by Francisco I. Madero in 1909. Hay fought in the Mexican Revolution until he was wounded in August 1911. After, he worked for the different Mexican governments, especially as diplomat abroad. From 1935 to 1940 he was Secretary of State during the government of Lázaro Cárdenas.
The Italian Giuseppe Garibaldi II served in various wars around the world before and after joining Madero's army in 1910. He is especially honored for his actions in the battle of Nuevo Casas Grandes. Between Garibaldi and Hay is Col. Mariano Hernandez of Guadalupe de Sauceria, Chihuahua. To Eduardo Hay's right is Raul Madero(Francisco Madero's brother).

Collection:: Leigh W. Osborn Photograph Collection

Accession no:: PH026-1-1-012

Out of Area / Ciudad Juarez, (1910 - 1919), Revolution

  • Mexican Revolution
  • war
  • Revolucion Mexicana
  • guerra

THANKS for sharing this photo, the man with the white beard in between Garibaldi and Hay is my great great grandfather, Col. Mariano Hernandez of Guadalupe de Sauceria, Chihuahua. Thank yoou.

Thank you for giving us the information about your Great Great Grandfather.

To Eduardo Hay's right is Raul Madero (Francisco Madero's brother). Thank you.

Added between Garibaldi and Hay is Col. Mariano Hernandez of Guadalupe de Sauceria, Chihuahua. To Eduardo Hay's right is Raul Madero(Francisco Madero's brother).

I teach high school Latin American History and thanks to my cousin Reinato Olivas just discovered my great great great grandfather is Mariano Olivas. My dad remembers his Tata Mariano yet never told us about him until Reinato shared this picture with us. Fills me with great pride as I've taught and studied the Mexican Revolution. Wish I would've known this in college so I could brag to my awesome professor. Thanks for the archives. I hope to visit one day.

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description

The image shows Francisco I. Madero and his wife Sara Pérez. Madero started the Mexican Revolution in 1910 in order to overthrow the dictatorial regime of President Porfirio Diaz. From 1911 to 1913 he served as Mexican President, before he was deposed and executed in 1913 by Victoriano Huerta, a general who had served under Díaz.
Born into a very wealthy family, Madero was well educated and started to be politically active in 1903. He founded his own newspaper, in which he advocated social justice and democracy. In particular, he criticized the gap between the rich and the poor in Mexico and the repression of Diaz’s critics. For the presidential elections in 1910, Madero organized the “Anti-Reelectionist” party. His campaign became very popular, which is why Diaz arrested him and others on a falsified charge of plotting armed insurrection. Madero was bailed out of jail by his wealthy father, but Diaz had "won" the election. In response, Madero called for armed revolution. Pancho Villa and Pascual Orozco commanded Madero’s army in the Battle of Juarez in April/May 1911, which they won. Their victory led to Diaz’s resignation and to the election of Madero as Mexican President.
Today, the people of Mexico see him as the father of revolution that eventually would do much to level the playing field between the rich and the poor.
He married his wife Sara Pérez in 1903.


Collection:: Leigh W. Osborn Photograph Collection

Accession no:: PH026-1-1-017

Out of Area / Out of Area, (1910 - 1919), Revolution

  • Mexican Revolution
  • Madero
  • Revolucion Mexicana

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"Long Tom" is written on the image. Soldiers are standing next to cannon. This image maybe taken during the Mexican Revolution.

Collection:: Wayne Brendt Print and Postcard Collection

Accession no:: MS245-1-1-029

Out of Area / Out of Area, (1910 - 1919), Meet El Pasoans

  • Mexican Revolution
  • Revolucion Mexicana

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Pascual Orozco (1882-1915), small-time entrepreneur, storekeeper and muleteer from the state of Chihuahua, objected to the Porfirio Díaz dictatorship, and first ran into trouble with the law when caught with anti-Díaz literature in 1906. When Francisco I. Madero called for an uprising against Díaz in 1910, Orozco supported him and was placed in command of the revolutionary forces in Guerrero. Together with the troops of Pancho Villa and Madero, he captured several key towns in Northern Mexico, amongst them Ciudad Juarez. The alliance between the three commanders was uneasy and led to several quarrels. Orozco was a cruel and ruthless commander. When Porfirio Diaz had to resign and Madero came to power, he saw Orozco as violent bumpkin, not useful in his government. Consequently, Orozco was upset with Madero because he was not part of the new regime and also because of Madero's failure to implement social reforms which he had promised. Together with his men Orozco then fought against Madero. After the assassination of Madero in 1913, he became one of Victoriano Huerta's generals. However, Orozco and Huerta's troops could not withstand their opponents and they finally went into exile.
Traveling around the U. S. to get support for a new revolution, both were arrested on their way to El Paso and charged with conspiracy to violate U.S. neutrality laws in 1915. Orozco was placed under house arrest in his family's home at 1315 Wyoming Avenue in El Paso but managed to escape. In August he was killed by Texas Rangers. On September, 3 1915 Orozco's remains were buried on Concordia Cemetery in El Paso, at the decision of his wife dressed in a full Mexican general's uniform, with the Mexican flag draping his coffin. In 1923, his remains were returned to his home state of Chihuahua.

Collection:: Wayne Brendt Print and Postcard Collection

Accession no:: MS245-1-1-028

Out of Area / Ciudad Juarez, (1910 - 1919), Revolution

  • Mexican Revolution
  • Orozco
  • Madero
  • Revolucion Mexicana

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The photograph shows revolutionary leader Francisco I. Madero with Captain Maximo Castillo in their headquarter during the Battle of Juarez. Castillo (1864-1919) had joined the revolutionary forces to fight the dictatorship of Mexican President Porfirio Diaz. He was the boss of Madero's escort. In 1913, when Madero was President, he broke with him because he felt that Madero could not realize his promises and instead, joined Emiliano Zapata in his revolt against Madero. Later, when he fled he was captured in the United States and put into prison on Fort Bliss, El Paso. After his release, he found exile in Cuba, where he died.
Francisco I. Madero (1873-1913) is seen as the as the father of the Mexican Revolution. With his “Anti-Reelectionist” party he challenged Porfirio Diaz. The obvious manipulations of the elections in 1910 (Madero was put into prison on a falsified charge) led to the gathering of rebels and the Battle of Juarez as first stage of the revolution. In its consequence Porfirio Diaz had to resign and Madero became new President. He was assassinated in 1913.

Collection:: Wayne Brendt Print and Postcard Collection

Accession no:: MS245-1-1-027

Out of Area / Ciudad Juarez, (1910 - 1919), Revolution

  • Mexican Revolution
  • Madero
  • Castillo
  • Revolucion Mexicana

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description

Francisco I. Madero (1873-1913) started the Mexican Revolution in 1910 in order to overthrow the dictatorial regime of President Porfirio Diaz. From 1911 to 1913 he served as Mexican President, before he was deposed and executed in 1913 by Victoriano Huerta, a general who had served under Díaz.
Born into a very wealthy family, Madero was well educated and started to be politically active in 1903. He founded his own newspaper, in which he advocated social justice and democracy. In particular, he criticized the gap between the rich and the poor in Mexico and the repression of Diaz’s critics. For the presidential elections in 1910, Madero organized the “Anti-Reelectionist” party. His campaign became very popular, which is why Diaz arrested him and others on a falsified charge of plotting armed insurrection. Madero was bailed out of jail by his wealthy father, but Diaz had "won" the election. In response, Madero called for armed revolution. Pancho Villa and Pascual Orozco commanded Madero’s army in the Battle of Juarez in April/May 1911, which they won. Their victory led to Diaz’s resignation and to the election of Madero as Mexican President.
Today, the people of Mexico see him as the father of revolution that eventually would do much to level the playing field between the rich and the poor.
He married his wife Sara Pérez in 1903.

Collection:: Wayne Brendt Print and Postcard Collection

Accession no:: MS245-1-1-024

Out of Area / Ciudad Juarez, (1910 - 1919), Revolution

  • Mexican Revolution
  • Madero
  • Revolucion Mexicana

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This portrait of Porfirio Diaz is from the 1910s. Diaz served as Mexican President for several terms between 1876 and 1911. He is a controversial figure, having brought internal stability on one hand but repressing his critics on the other hand. Diaz was overthrown during the Mexican Revolution and fled to France. He died in Paris in 1915.

Collection:: Wayne Brendt Print and Postcard Collection

Accession no:: MS245-1-1-018

Out of Area / Out of Area, (1910 - 1919), Revolution

  • Porfirio Diaz
  • Mexican Revolution
  • dictator
  • mexico

Porfirio fue exiliado en Francia y murio en Paris. No fue en España.

Thank you -- you are correct he fled to France not Spain. Correction made--thanks.

He was a dictator. That`s his proper title.

yes, he was a dictator.

daddy

ayyyyyy fam

Nice mustacho (:

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description

Pancho Villa (1878-1923) was a Mexican revolutionary leader who advocated for the poor. Though he was a killer and a bandit, many remember him as a folk hero. Born into a poor family, he learned the gap between the rich and the poor in Mexico in the end of the 19th century the hard way. After having shot the owner of the hacienda on which his family lived and worked with at the age of 16, Villa ran from the law and became the leader of a group of bandits.
Because of his skills as a guerilla fighter, he caught the attention of men who were planning a revolution. Since Porfirio Diaz, the sitting president of Mexico, had created much of the current problems for the poor and Francisco Madero promised change for the lower classes, Pancho Villa joined Madero and became an effective leader in the revolutionary army from October 1910 to May 1911. Together with Madero and Pascual Orozco, he commanded the troops during the Battle of Juarez, which led to the resignation of Diaz. However, in May 1911, he resigned from command because of differences with Orozco.
Villa married Maria Luz Corral and tried to settle down. When Orozco started a new rebellion against Madero, who had become Mexican President, Villa supported Madero together with General Victoriano Huerta. When Huerta became a Madero adversary and eventually killed him to claim the presidency for himself, Villa allied himself with Venustiano Carranza to fight against Huerta.
Villa was extremely successful, but in the summer of 1914 he and Carranza became enemies and fought against each other for the next several years. The United States supported Carranza, which is why Villa attacked the town of Columbus, New Mexico, in 1916. His attack was the first on American soil since 1812. Under the leadership of General Pershing, the U.S. sent thousands of soldiers across the border to hunt for Pancho Villa (Punitive Expedition), but they never caught him.
When Adolfo De la Huerta became the interim president of Mexico in 1920, Villa agreed to retire from revolutionary life but was gunned down in 1923.

Collection:: Wayne Brendt Print and Postcard Collection

Accession no:: MS245-1-1-016

Out of Area / Out of Area, (1910 - 1919), Revolution

  • Mexican Revolution
  • Pancho Villa

NICE!!!!

His birthday is wrong, please correct it.

Correction made---Thank You!!

¡cool cat!

pancho villa was a good leader .

this is SWAG

Disculpa pero no entiendo lo que tratas de decir or preguntar. Por favor explica lo que tratas de decir un poco mas para que nosotros podramos acistir y responder con mejor informacion.

Mi General

pancho

check for artiist

viva villa

My Abuelito´s name was Francisco. My grandmother used to call him "Quico" but others used to call him "Pancho".

you can see his finger at the pawn shop in downtown

cool

cool

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John Joseph Pershing (1860 – 1948), was a general officer in the United States Army and promoted in his lifetime to General of the Armies, the highest authorized rank in the United States Army, signifying service directly under the president.
In January 1914, Pershing arrived in El Paso to take command of the Army 8th Brigade that was stationed at Fort Bliss. The 8th Brigade had been assigned the task of securing the U.S. - Mexico border because of the Mexican Revolution.
After a year at Fort Bliss, Pershing decided to arrange for his family to join him. Shortly before their relocation, he received a telegram telling him that his wife and his three daughters had been burned to death because of a fire in the Presidio of San Francisco. Only his six-year-old son Warren could escape the fire. After the funerals Pershing returned to Fort Bliss with his son and his sister, and resumed his duties as commanding officer.
In 1916, the revolutionary and outlaw Pancho Villa attacked Columbus in New Mexico. His attack was the first on American soil since 1812. As a consequence, the U.S. sent thousands of soldiers across the border to hunt for Pancho Villa under the leadership of General Pershing (Punitive Expedition). They never caught him.
With the entry of the U.S. in World War I, Pershing was selected to lead the American Expeditionary Force to Europe. He also was promoted to general. By war's end, Pershing's command had grown to 1.8 million men. The success of American troops during World War I was largely credited to Pershing's leadership and he returned to the US as a hero. Before retiring from active service in 1924, he served as chief of staff of the U.S. Army.
Pershing was the most accomplished and celebrated American soldier of the early 20th century. In El Paso, he is particularly associated with the Punitive Expedition. The Pershing House at Fort Bliss is located at 228 Sheridan Rd. Fort Bliss.

Collection:: Stout-Feldman Studio Photographs

Accession no:: PH074-832-4

Northeast / Ft. Bliss, (1910 - 1919), Military

  • Pancho Villa
  • punitive expidition
  • war
  • Military
  • general
  • Punitive Expedition
  • pershing
  • Mexican Revolution
  • Ft. Bliss
  • expedicion punitiva
  • guerra
  • militar
  • Revolucion Mexicana

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description

The portrait shows Francisco I. Madero. Madero started the Mexican Revolution in 1910 in order to overthrow the dictatorial regime of President Porfirio Diaz. From 1911 to 1913 he served as Mexican President, before he was deposed and executed in 1913 by Victoriano Huerta, a general who had served under Díaz.
Born into a very wealthy family, Madero was well educated and started to be politically active in 1903. He founded his own newspaper, in which he advocated social justice and democracy. In particular, he criticized the gap between the rich and the poor in Mexico and the repression of Diaz’s critics. For the presidential elections in 1910, Madero organized the “Anti-Reelectionist” party. His campaign became very popular, which is why Diaz arrested him and others on a falsified charge of plotting armed insurrection. Madero was bailed out of jail by his wealthy father, but Diaz had "won" the election. In response, Madero called for armed revolution. Pancho Villa and Pascual Orozco commanded Madero’s army in the Battle of Juarez in April/May 1911, which they won. Their victory led to Diaz’s resignation and to the election of Madero as Mexican President.
Today, the people of Mexico see him as the father of revolution that eventually would do much to level the playing field between the rich and the poor.
He married his wife Sara Pérez in 1903.

Collection:: Stout-Feldman Studio Photographs

Accession no:: PH074-889B

Out of Area / Out of Area, (1910 - 1919), Revolution

  • mexico
  • war
  • revolution
  • Madero
  • Mexican Revolution
  • guerra
  • revolucion
  • Revolucion Mexicana

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